In-studio guest, CTU Political Organizer, Brandon Johnson.

Friday, December 27, 2013

How about telling the Tale of 2 Cities in Chicago?

Lovely Warren (left) celebrates victory
The two-cities movement is spreading beyond New York City, where it swept Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio into office. This same focus on inequality is also what led to the election last month of Lovely Warren as Mayor of Rochester.

According to the New York Times:
Warren won election as mayor of Rochester last month with a campaign lamenting what she called the “two Rochesters,” challenged by crime and poverty, but also boasting prosperous neighborhoods.
 The push in New York comes as a variety of elected officials across the nation have begun talking more insistently about income inequality, an issue that has been discussed for some years but has rarely prompted significant action.
This tale of two cities must become the narrative of any serious contender who has the courage and political savvy to challenge Rahm Emanuel and the one-percenters who run the political machinery,  in the next Chicago mayor's race. It's one that will resonate with most of the people in this city and create the basis for successful, independent political movement in the city that can take back Chicago and its schools

1 comment:

  1. "This tale of two cities must become the narrative of any serious contender who has the courage and political savvy to challenge Rahm Emanuel and the one-percenters who run the political machinery, in the next Chicago mayor's race."

    I think most of us that follow this blog are in agreement with Mike's statement. But who is this "serious contender" who must emerge to challenge Rahm Emanuel in the next mayoral election? I really don't see any candidate(s) on the political horizon capable of mounting a serious challenge to Emanuel. Not viable one's at least. The handful of alderman who stand up to Emanuel don't seem too interested in throwing their hats in the ring. So, we can all agree that Emanuel is defeatable based on a number of issues but there has to be SOMEONE to run against him who is not perceived as a fringe candidate who doesn't generate enough interest amongst Chicago voters.

    ReplyDelete

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