Wednesday, June 3, 2009

A set-back for charter school teachers

Charters are "private schools"

For years, the charter school lobbyists and management companies have been fending off charges of "privatization" by arguing that charter schools were "public schools." But once teachers begain signing union cards their lawyers advised them to change their tune.
Yesterday, the National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) issued a highly-anticipated ruling on the jurisdictional disagreement that has stalled a unionization bid by teachers at three Civitas charter schools in Chicago. The board determined that as a for-profit agency, Civitas -- which is owned by the non-profit Chicago International Charter Schools (CICS) -- is a private entity. As a result, the organizing campaign must petition the NLRB, rather than the Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board (IELRB). (Progress Illinois)
Small neighborhood schools making a difference in Philly

These findings indicate that making non-selective neighborhood high schools smaller could play a role in stemming the dropout tide, according to the report, called Going Small. “The data suggest that families are interested in small high schools and that these schools, across admissions categories, are beginning to make a difference for student engagement and achievement,” the report says. “In addition, small neighborhood high schools seem to be a promising option for reform of large neighborhood high schools.” (The Notebook)
San Diego backs off of school closings

"It is extremely irresponsible to go to families and communities just before the last week of school and say, 'Your school is not going to exist anymore,'" said school board member John Lee Evans, who introduced the motion to forgo closing schools next year. He added, "This kneejerk closing schools is definitely not the solution." (Voice of San Diego)


  1. So since they are private theyare going toreturn all public money thy have accepted and refuse all future public money, right?

  2. I doubt it, Anon. They will more likely ask for more and get more. After all, lots of public dollars go to private companies. Think bailout, GM, Blackwater...


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