Friday, May 1, 2009

May Day thoughts

Testing the economy
At a time when the Big Boys have devastated our economy, in ways that affect us all, but are hardest—of course—on the most vulnerable, they are upping their propaganda: "It’s not our fault?” Poverty has been redefined: it’s the side effect of poor schooling! All those side effects would be cured—cheaply—if we required schools to perform properly. Schools are suffering from attracting the wrong people to teaching—“sub-par” people, in Chancellor Klein’s words—and too much allowed leeway in the practice of their mission. (Deb Meier, Bridging Differences).
L.A. teachers vote for a 1-day strike
The union representing Los Angeles teachers is organizing for a possible one-day strike next month to protest looming layoffs. The work stoppage would have to be approved by a majority of teachers, who will be able to vote over a several-day period, starting today. Last week, the Los Angeles Board of Education, by a 4-3 vote, approved a budget package that could result in more than 5,300 job losses, including about 3,500 teachers who lack tenure protection. (L.A. Times)
Facing South
May Day, a day historically used to celebrate the the contributions of working people around the globe, has become an important movement-building day for immigrant rights activists over the past couple of years in the United States. Over 1.5 million people took to the streets throughout the country (and across the South) on May Day 2006, culminating in the largest immigrant rights protest in U.S. history. (Facing South)
Marching in L.A.
Despite the nationwide furor over swine flu, thousands of people are expected to gather on Friday and march through downtown Los Angeles and MacArthur Park in support of immigrants' rights. (City News Service)

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